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An Unusual crater

Discussion in 'Astrophotography and Imaging' started by Avani Soares, Jan 12, 2018.

An Unusual crater

Started by Avani Soares on Jan 12, 2018 at 5:05 PM

4 Replies 244 Views 1 Likes

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  1. Avani Soares

    Avani Soares Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    An unusual crater!
    Talking with his friend Cícero Soares, he called my attention to the unusual form of Lavoiser A. I was quite sure that I had never done a specific capture of this crater but I remembered that when I took pictures of the super moon of 2016 it should appear.
    I checked my files and did not give another, there was this interesting crater. I used to make a specific process of this region and here we can see it in the photo. It is located very close to the lunar northwest limb and therefore in a region that makes it impossible to photograph it from the top which causes that in the photograph of profile can not be noticed its square form.
    Why are most craters circular? (up to craters found on Earth?) Impacting objects many miles a second into large laboratories, scientists have shown that only the most oblique impacts (less than 10 ° from the horizon) produce elliptical craters. The kinetic energy of a pendulum behaves like the energy of a nuclear bomb. The energy is transferred to the target material by a shock wave, and the shock waves produced by an impact, whether oblique or from the front, propagate hemispherically. This means that energy is being delivered equally in all directions; resulting in a hemispherical void and therefore circular craters. However, conditions in nature do not always reflect the laboratory. In fact, some craters are almost square! A portion of Lavoisier's Edge tells a story of geology before impact. Lavoisier A is a square crater with a diameter of ~ 26 km (16 miles) found in the northwest portion of Oceanus Procellarum.
    Much of the shape of Lavoisier A is thought to be due to preexisting junctions or flaws in the target rock. These discontinuities create zones of weakness, affecting the way the shock wave travels through the material. Mainly the square corner along the northern edge of the Lavoisier crater is evidence of pre-impact fracturing.
    We find square craters in other planetary bodies, as in the asteroid Eros and here on Earth! An example of a square crater that has been carefully studied is Meteor Crater in Arizona. This crater formed in layers of sedimentary rocks that have orthogonal vertical joints moving downward, from where the crater formed. The joints interrupted the flow of shock waves in certain directions, preventing the formation of a circular crater.
    The exact composition of the subsoil is not well known on the Moon but we can predict that something similar may have occurred.
    Source: LROC / NASA
    Adjective: Avani Soares
     
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  2. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

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    Wow, can I easily see this crater with my 127mm Mak?
     
  3. Avani Soares

    Avani Soares Well-Known Member

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    Facilmente não amigo Reggie pois ela está muito próxima da borda, mas será possível identificar com o seu telescópio perfeitamente.
     
  4. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

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    Obrigado. Eu vou tentar:D
     
  5. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    Lavoiser A is pretty easy to bag. It was named after Antoine Lavoiser, a French chemist of the 18th century and was the discoverer of Hydrogen. But he was a bit reckless...

    He was studying the properties of this new gas. And found it had 1/14th the weight of air. If you recall, it was Hydrogen that was used to inflate the German airship Hindenburg - and many others. Helium, which is twice the weight of Hydrogen at 1/7th that of air, was too rare and expensive. But back to Antoine...

    It was Lavoiser who discovered also another famous property of Hydrogen. He inhaled a full lung-full of it to see what that did. And then decided to see if it burned. So he exhaled his lung-full onto an open flame!

    It sure did burn! He wrote his findings from a hospital bed! :p

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antoine_Lavoisier


    Lavoiser A é muito fácil de guardar. Foi nomeado após Antoine Lavoiser, um químico francês do século 18 e foi o descobridor do hidrogênio. Mas ele era um pouco imprudente ...

    Ele estava estudando as propriedades deste novo gás. E descobriu que tinha 1/14 do peso do ar. Se você se lembra, foi o Hidrogênio usado para inflar o dirigível alemão Hindenburg - e muitos outros. O hélio, que é o dobro do peso do hidrogênio no 1/7 do que o ar, era muito raro e caro. Mas volte para Antoine ...

    Foi Lavoiser quem descobriu também outra propriedade famosa do hidrogênio. Ele inalou um pulmão cheio disso para ver o que isso aconteceu. E então decidiu ver se ele queimava. Então ele expirou o pulmão cheio em uma chama aberta!

    Com certeza queimou! Ele escreveu suas descobertas de uma cama de hospital! :p
     
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