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Birt E, an exceptional crater!

Discussion in 'Astrophotography and Imaging' started by Avani Soares, Sep 22, 2019.

Birt E, an exceptional crater!

Started by Avani Soares on Sep 22, 2019 at 7:49 PM

1 Replies 193 Views 3 Likes

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  1. Avani Soares

    Avani Soares Well-Known Member

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    [​IMG]
    In those times when the main planets are already in a bad position to photograph, when the weather doesn't help either, we decide to check the old files that were lost on the hard drive and sometimes come across real jewels.
    I've done many photos of this region, but few have reached this definition!
    The sun at very low angle helps a lot to highlight the details on the surface which makes the photo even more detailed.
    A curiosity in this region is the Birt E crater.
    The Birt E crater was not created like most craters on the moon; There was no meteorite impact. Magma exploded in this pyroclastic opening in Mare Nubium over 3.4 billion years ago, scattering the lava on the surface and leaving the crater we see today. How can we say it is a volcanic opening and not an impact crater? Impact craters and volcanic openings can be differentiated because openings are often irregularly shaped or elongated (as in Birt E). Impact craters are usually circular in shape, created by the shockwave during an impact event.
    In addition, the V-shape of this crater is probably a product of the formation mechanism. V-shaped openings are thought to be formed from a pyroclastic eruption. Fractional gases out of liquid rock create violent events during eruptions. Explosive eruptions created the form we see today, but Birt E could have a complex history, with effusive eruptions forming Rima Birt, a stream that flows from Birt E to the southwest of the moon.
    At sufficiently long timescales, Birt E will be filled with freshly formed crater ejections around Mare Nubium or by mass crumbling of the crater walls. Let's enjoy this ancient crater today while we still can!
    Source: Lunar Networks
    Adaptation and text: Avani Soares
     
    jgroub, Orion25 and squeege3000 like this.
  2. scrufy

    scrufy New Member

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    Thats a great shot. Ive done a few of that area with my 9.25 but not that much detail.
     

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