Dismiss Notice
New Cookie Policy
On May 24, 2018, we published revised versions of our Terms and Rules and Cookie Policy. Your use of AstronomyConnect.com’s services is subject to these revised terms.

class="prefix prefixSilver">Discussion celestron 102

Discussion in 'Eyepieces, Barlows, and Filters' started by scopedown, Aug 28, 2018.

celestron 102

Started by scopedown on Aug 28, 2018 at 5:22 PM

5 Replies 342 Views 1 Likes

Reply to Thread Post New Thread
  1. scopedown

    scopedown New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2018
    Posts:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    why can't I see any planets obviously a newbie. I have a 2X barlow and the 2 eyepieces (25mm & 9mm) that came with my month old, Nextar slt 102. The moon is great with just the 25mm but no planets. They are a big dark circle so, what am I doing wrong?
     
    Dave In Vermont likes this.
  2. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2016
    Posts:
    3,356
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Are you expecting to see them in huge size - like images in magazines? If so, that's the 'problem.' They will always be a smaller image. But you will be able to see the rings of Saturn. Mars will present as a reddish-orange disk. Jupiter (not available to us at present - but will be back!) would be a quite detailed disk with distinctive equatorial-belts around it. Venus is a bright, white-yellowish globe, and so forth. As to where they are, a good software-program would be a good place to start.

    These are also called Planetarium-programs that you set for your location (or it can do this by itself) that comes with excellent instructions. And then go to work to program it to your personal needs, wants, and taste. Now get this: Stellarium is absolutely FREE! I'd call it the greatest give-away in on-web freeware in history!

    So for now, here's my 'Copy & Paste' that will lead you to it's door-step, and a near-to turning it on the first time, and my advanced programmed edition:


    "On this link is the main page for downloading Stellarium. Choose which version is correct for your computer. Here you go:

    http://stellarium.org/


    As for instructions, a full copy of them is bundled with the program that you download. But if you need another copy for some reason, these can be downloaded from the Stellarium site above.
    This program is quite large, so download when you have a few minutes. I'll leave you with 2 screenshots: First one shows basically how Stellarium appears before you customize it, while the 2nd. shows my copy while identifying a satellite. Mine is much more advanced - just to give you an idea about Stellarium's great range of options. Please know that I am an experienced user."


    Stellarium Screenshot - Beginning Screen.png


    &



    stellarium-1336.png

    While you get squared away with all this -


    Greetings and welcome to A-C! It's nice to have you aboard.

    It's nice to see new folks' here, and please feel free to ask questions here, someone is bound to happen upon them and do their best to find you an answer. Soon you'll be the one answering them! So, in the meantime, throw your feet up and relax. We pride ourselves and being informal here. So you certainly may too yourself!

    Talk again soon!

    Dave - Somewhere around 44.28N and - 73.13 W.
     
    Last edited: Aug 28, 2018
  3. Gabby76

    Gabby76 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2016
    Posts:
    307
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Slovakia/ Canada
    Find the planet with the 25mm eyepiece and then once it is centered and tracking use the 25mm + barlow and see how the view is. You should be able to at least see the two main equatorial bands and hints of the temperate zones.
    A trick for planets is to view then without having your eyes dark adapted, the brightness of the planet will blur the detail and make it look like a bright ball.
    One of the best times to start viewing planets is as soon as they are visible at dusk. As you observe them your eye will adapt to the darkening skies.
    The 9mm + barlow combination will be to much power for the telescope and the eyepiece itself is not great quality so the combination of the two may also be affecting the view.

    I have the SLT 102mm also and it is a fun refractor. :)
     
    Dave In Vermont likes this.
  4. scopedown

    scopedown New Member

    Joined:
    Aug 28, 2018
    Posts:
    2
    Trophy Points:
    3
    Thanks for all of the help and information, I will give another go tonight and see what I can see.
     
    Dave In Vermont likes this.
  5. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2016
    Posts:
    3,356
    Trophy Points:
    113
    As Gabby suggested - and I fully concur - start with your lower-power eyepiece. Get it focused as best as you & and 'seeing' conditions allow. Then increase the magnification.

    You'll get there! We all did when we started out.

    Let us know how it goes, please? Thanks!

    Dave
     
  6. sickfish

    sickfish Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2016
    Posts:
    76
    Trophy Points:
    8
    Location:
    Watertown Massachusetts U.S.A.
    Planets look like dots.
    Seeing has to be good. Saturn will show its rings even in a small scope.
    Jupiter will show cloud bands and its moons.
    Big dark circles, this does not sound like planets. Maybe a defocused planet.
    You will see stars next to planets, they should be focused.
     
    Dave In Vermont likes this.

Share This Page