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Hind's Crimson Star (R Leporis)

Discussion in 'Astrophotography and Imaging' started by Orion25, Jan 13, 2022.

Hind's Crimson Star (R Leporis)

Started by Orion25 on Jan 13, 2022 at 4:00 PM

5 Replies 99 Views 3 Likes

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  1. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

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    Another annual photo I like to take is that of the reddest star I've ever seen visually, the carbon star R Leporis a.k.a. Hind's Crimson Star, just south of Orion. It was noticeably brighter than from years past:

    ASTRONOMY - HIND'S CRIMSON STAR 1-12-22 CAPTION SM.jpg

    My favorite shot so far was taken in 2019 when it was remarkably red but less bright, like a drop of blood in the sky:
    ASTRONOMY - HIND'S CRIMSON STAR 1-31-19 CAPTION SM.jpg

    Clear skies!
    Reggie:cool:
     

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    Last edited: Jan 13, 2022
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  2. Ed D

    Ed D Well-Known Member

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    I remember the first time I saw this star. It looked like a red LED. You probably caught this one when it was at its maxima.

    Ed
     
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  3. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

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    I think you're right. When I first looked at it before imaging I wasn't sure if it was the right star because it was so bright. But, it was in the right spot and had the reddish hue.
     
  4. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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    Apparently Baader BBHS silver coated mirrors and prisms are really good for bringing out the red end of the spectrum. I've always thought they were good for the GRS as well. I saw the Winter Albireo and the Little Beehive recently. Although I had to wait until Sirius was near transit as these objects are low for me. I looked for R Leporis last night but the Moon was too high and bright. So I looked at Schroter's Valley.
     
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  5. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

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    I saw the Little Beehive on the same night I imaged R Leporis. I believe I have an image of it. I took one of the Winter Albireo that I'll post as soon as I find it, lol. I didn't know that about the Baader BBHS and the red end of the spectrum. Hmmmmm, adding things to my 2022 list of toys!
     
  6. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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    I'll look forward to your images Reggie.

    bbhs.jpg

    Admittedly these aren't cheap, but they're very good. The Baader Amicis are also BBHS coated. For a long time I thought the GRS was getting less red. A few years ago I used the Baader Amici a lot for observing Jupiter. In recent years I switched to a TV Everbrite or Takahashi prism. It was when I used the BBHS conventional prism that the GRS regained its usual redness! So the silver coating does make a difference.
     
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