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Jupiter question

Discussion in 'Beginner's Corner' started by Pleiades, Mar 15, 2018.

Jupiter question

Started by Pleiades on Mar 15, 2018 at 7:15 AM

10 Replies 607 Views 1 Likes

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  1. Pleiades

    Pleiades Well-Known Member

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    • If the clouds on Jupiter are -200 degrees or so, and yet the planet core is as hot or hotter than our sun, why doesn't it go Nova?
    • The surface gasses are helium and hydrogen based, no/yes??
     
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  2. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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    I'm kinda hoping it doesn't go nova, at least for a while lol. I've heard gas giants referred to as failed stars. So Jupiter failed as a star, but excelled as a planet.

    j1.jpg j2.jpg j3.jpg
     
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  3. Pleiades

    Pleiades Well-Known Member

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    Failed stars, that makes sense. Cool stuff. Thanks
     
  4. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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  5. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    That Jupiter does include Hydrogen and Helium (Helium is a trace element in Jupiter) - it can't go Solar due to it's not having enough mass to successfully set-off nuclear-fusion.

    Our Sun is also composed of Hydrogen & Helium. And does and did have enough mass to create fusion. The fusion of Hydrogen is what creates Helium, and progressively heavier elements. I'm posting an interesting Periodic-Chart of all the elements and how they became elements:


    Solar-System Origins in Deep-Space.jpg

    Worthy of printing-out and placement on a wall! At least it would be - if you were a chemist like Yours' Truly.

    P.S. - Great posting, Pleiades! You've asked a very important question!
     
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  6. Pleiades

    Pleiades Well-Known Member

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    Cool chart Dave. Lots for me to learn.

    Thanks
     
  7. Pleiades

    Pleiades Well-Known Member

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    I bookmarked the Wikipedia ink on gas Giants. Thanks Mak
     
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  8. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes - thanks for the Wiki, Mak. It's a very well done summation of this fascinating subject! Now back to building my H-Bomb...
     
  9. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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  10. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    Pleiades - If you do want to learn some chemistry, feel free to ask me any questions that you may have. I first taught chemistry at age 15 in a very progressive high-school for kids who were way past the average and thus were diagnosed as 'trouble-makers'
    by their local town school-board. Hence this place was run as a liberal-arts college.

    In order to shake my school-board down for the tuition of this place, once a year I had to convince 'em they didn't want me back. I'd twitch, drool into a Dixie-Cup®, and say "Duh!" when they asked me questions. Ka-Ching$$$$!

    So teaching is in my blood. I'm going to try to find you another periodic-table that gives the properties and uses (and hazards) of all the elements for you. I'd just bring it here and post it, but our forum here has a 2MB cap. The chart I'm describing is a bit larger.

    See Ya!

    D.
     
  11. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    Pleiades:

    I just tracked down the Periodic-Table program I was alluding to. And Eureka! It was a beast to find. I think I need to boil my computer in water! But found it - in a .zip file format that will fit here!

    I scanned this for virus/malware - clean:

    Periodic_Table.net_v3.0.zip

    Have fun & ask any questions freely!
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 16, 2018
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