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m22 vs m13

Discussion in 'Observing Celestial Objects' started by kevan hubbard, Aug 28, 2017.

m22 vs m13

Started by kevan hubbard on Aug 28, 2017 at 3:46 AM

6 Replies 59 Views 1 Likes

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  1. kevan hubbard

    kevan hubbard Well-Known Member

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    Not to offend any northern hemispherians,of which I'm one but did spend my youth in the southern hemisphere, but I think m22 is very superior to m13.Sagittarius never rises high from my present location but even at those low altitudes it really sticks out and looks bigger than m13 does right up on the canopy. I had a late summer walk through some local hills yesterday and observed both just using my travel 8x25 monocular. I'm going to say that m22 can't be far off 47 tucana and must be naked eye under a dark sky whist m13 would require very good eyes even under dark skies.omega centauri and 47 tucana are the only globulars I've seen naked eye but I'll wager m22 wouldn't be difficult.
     
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  2. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

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    M22 is magnificent! I love the way it resolves the longer you look at it. I first discovered it only a few years ago while reveling in the beauty of the Sagittarius region. I'll say with confidence that it's more striking than M13 because it resolves into finer detail and is, in fact, a bit brighter. It is low on the horizon, but fortunately for me (in Georgia) not too low to get distorted by atmospheric murk. On a good night (Bortle 5 for me), it's pretty close to naked eye visibility.

    Reggie
     
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  3. kevan hubbard

    kevan hubbard Well-Known Member

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    Yes I was studying it from much further north last night, along with m13.I think m22 covers a wider area and m22 more diffuse? Can you see Omega centauri from Georgia? I know 47 tucana is out from that latitude.
     
  4. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I think m13 is more dense and compact. I can't see Omega Centauri from my location. Technically, OC just barely hugs the southern horizon from Georgia. I'll have to trek a bit farther south. Maybe Florida?
     
  5. kevan hubbard

    kevan hubbard Well-Known Member

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    I'd guess Omega's visible from Florida but 47 tucana is much further south. The only northern hemisphere countries I've seen Omega from are el Salvador,Guatemala and Belize. I have had beautiful views of 47 tucana from south Africa, Australia and New Zealand and a poor light polluted view from Brazil. There's another globular close to 47,NGC 362,which is easy to see,it's superimposed on the edge of the SMG.
     
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  6. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

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    Kevan, I would love to be able to do some astronomy at the Chichen Itza site or at Teotihuacan. Machu Picchu would be the ultimate for me! Have you ever been to these sites?
     
  7. kevan hubbard

    kevan hubbard Well-Known Member

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    Sadly I've not been to them,I've been to Mexico city and Acapulco in Mexico only Mexico city has a temple right in the central area but don't know if it was used by ancient astronomers,guess it was.about 2 years ago I stayed at Avebury, in s.w.England, the village is in a huge neolithic stone circle. I had very clear coldish nights and the skies where very dark I seem to recall seeing m41 in canis major naked eye.the area to the south is very dark with a low population and a human free military training area,north however there's a big,and very mundane, town called Swindon which pumps it's light dome into the northern sky.Avebury is far more impressive than Stonehenge but not as well known..... Strange?!
     
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