Dismiss Notice
New Cookie Policy
On May 24, 2018, we published revised versions of our Terms and Rules and Cookie Policy. Your use of AstronomyConnect.com’s services is subject to these revised terms.

m82 Cigar galaxy {an edge -on Starburst galaxy}

Discussion in 'Astrophotography and Imaging' started by stepping beyond, Jul 1, 2022.

m82 Cigar galaxy {an edge -on Starburst galaxy}

Started by stepping beyond on Jul 1, 2022 at 12:03 PM

11 Replies 631 Views 4 Likes

Reply to Thread Post New Thread
  1. stepping beyond

    stepping beyond Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Posts:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Kings Mountain , North Carolina
    I've been slack on processing and finally made some time to tackle some of my hoarded data . So , this is my 1st time shooting on this target since getting the asi 1600mm pro . Here's my 1st go in RGB and Ha on m82 , for countless reasons my red channel is being a bugger to align with all the other channels. It's about 12 million ly's from Earth, being the nearest Starburst galaxy to us. The burst is likely triggered by m81 it's brighter neighbor. It took over a month to acquire all this data , along with m81 , 101 and 63 which I just finished collecting on this year. color-m82-Cigar-galaxy06-cr.jpg
     
    Nebula, Ed D, Orion25 and 1 other person like this.
  2. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2016
    Posts:
    1,608
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Georgia
    Amazing data, sb! Nice to see you back on here :)
     
    stepping beyond likes this.
  3. Ed D

    Ed D Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2017
    Posts:
    654
    Trophy Points:
    93
    Location:
    Sunny South Florida
    Well done!

    Ed
     
    stepping beyond likes this.
  4. Nebula

    Nebula Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2016
    Posts:
    1,597
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Vivid colors , surprising, the red core of it.
    Nice!
     
    stepping beyond likes this.
  5. stepping beyond

    stepping beyond Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Posts:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Kings Mountain , North Carolina
    Thank yall , I kept processing and with patience came this. color-m82-7.jpg The weather has been tropical here and honey do list kept growing , I've been hurting too bad to get out but, hopefully things will turn around.
     
    Last edited: Jul 14, 2022
    Mak the Night, Orion25 and Nebula like this.
  6. Nebula

    Nebula Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2016
    Posts:
    1,597
    Trophy Points:
    83
    @stepping beyond ah yeah the second picture is an improvement, it's as if the core was shooting matter outside like a black hole?

    Very interesting picture.
     
    stepping beyond likes this.
  7. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2016
    Posts:
    1,608
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Location:
    Georgia
    I can see the difference; fabulous image!
     
    stepping beyond likes this.
  8. stepping beyond

    stepping beyond Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Posts:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Kings Mountain , North Carolina
    I've been trying to get back to it but, this heat and storms at night just don't do the sky justice. I took advantage of the downtime and cleaned up my imaging train ; primary & secondary mirrors, lenses , Coma Corrector and sensors in all my cameras. Lined the guide with the main camera , all that's left is collimating the 8"Black Widow in the evening then I'll be off and running. I thank you and appreciate the comments fellas , I make mistakes and I do try learning from them but, my memory after days of not getting out are time consuming mistakes. Mistakes after the meridian flip are so costly in my color data collection. Only if I could use all the data that I collected, instead of dumping channels because of my camera having an oil leak from I believe it was the tec fan lubricant.
     
    Nebula and Orion25 like this.
  9. Nebula

    Nebula Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2016
    Posts:
    1,597
    Trophy Points:
    83
    I make plenty of mistakes too and need to work on the visual train of my new telescope restart the collimation from scratch. I am having problems enjoying that never ending process of trial and error until it's good enough.

    Do you have a tip to enjoy this @stepping beyond ? It's more work with photography.
     
    stepping beyond likes this.
  10. stepping beyond

    stepping beyond Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Posts:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Kings Mountain , North Carolina
    That's what I did for the first 5 years . Trial and error is the way to becoming one with the force. I don't know anyone who hasn't pulled their hair out, whether it's viewing or shooting astrophotography. Learn your equipment, learn your night sky, you can read a dozen books on astrophotography but, there is no book telling you how to speed things along. Collimation you can use either a collimating eyepiece cap or a good collimating laser {get your eye centered or the beam of the laser in the center of the ring on the mirror and covering the dot on your laser collimator {the beam should be shooting off in 2 directions from the dot} its collimated. Then tighten up the thumbscrews real tight but, don't lose your split beams . Then get close look down the focus tube without anything in it and your eyeball should be in the center of the of the mirror. If it isn't, then the next step is a time consumer, it might be adjusting the tilt of the primary or the misalignment of the secondary mirror. It can be anything but, these are the most common in what I used to deal with. Don't be in a hurry , that's when things can get bad . REPEAT troubleshooting. A bahtinov mask is the trick to focusing .
     
    Last edited: Jul 30, 2022
    Nebula likes this.
  11. Nebula

    Nebula Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2016
    Posts:
    1,597
    Trophy Points:
    83
    Ah yeah trial and error, this is it.. and time.

    I spent some time on collimation a couple of days ago, the result was obviously very good on the planets today, I've got a 12" mirror with not too bad collimation. :) I'll enjoy it like that without searching for more perfection, for the moment.

    I never tried a laser, I use a cap and a Cheshire sight tube. The reason I don't have a laser is because of the price for a good one almost exclusively.. the cap and the Cheshire were about 1/6 of the price of a good laser. (If not even less)
     
  12. stepping beyond

    stepping beyond Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2016
    Posts:
    123
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Kings Mountain , North Carolina
    I use both collimation cap and a $50 laser collimator but, that's astrophotography .Dead center or close as possible even though I don't have to collimate it with the laser except if I take the image train out to clean. A collimation cap is priceless with a focuser precision centering adapter , I use that piece of plastic every time I go out to image. Keep looking up
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2022 at 8:55 AM

Share This Page