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Mars in 685nm IR - 14 January 2023

Discussion in 'Astrophotography and Imaging' started by Ed D, Jan 15, 2023.

Mars in 685nm IR - 14 January 2023

Started by Ed D on Jan 15, 2023 at 5:21 AM

3 Replies 133 Views 2 Likes

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  1. Ed D

    Ed D Well-Known Member

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    Last night the temperature was cold for Miami, shorts and T-Shirt weather for y'all up north, and the sky looked crystal clear. This is as good as it gets where I'm located and I wanted to take images of Jupiter and Mars. Long story short, every capture in RGB24 was SLOW no matter what I tried. When I switched to 685nm IR the capture speed jumped up over 10x faster. The frame rate looked like the speedometer of a Lambo on the Autobahn.

    I actually like the crisp contrast and detail. Looking closely at about 11 O'Clock you can make out the volcanic region. Not bad for such a tiny image so late in this apparition.

    2023 01-14 Mars in 685nm IR.jpg
    Mars in 685nm IR Pass - 14 January 2023

    Ed D
     
    Orion25 and Nebula like this.
  2. Ed D

    Ed D Well-Known Member

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    This image is from VIRTUAL PLANET ATLAS set to 2023 01 14 @ 19:45:00 EST:

    Virtual Planet Atlas Image.jpg
     
    Last edited: Jan 15, 2023
  3. Nebula

    Nebula Well-Known Member

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    Wow yeah your image is very strong, my observation with the 8" revealed the same darker shades at the same places exactly (except reversed 180 degree) Thanks it helps me to validate my own observation

    The phase was easy to see.

    It's not common that you publish black and white images? the details are clear though.
     
  4. Ed D

    Ed D Well-Known Member

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    Thanks, Neb. Before I got into imaging I used to go on a couple of websites to verify what I had observed or sketched. Even with this image, I used Virtual Planet Atlas to help me verify what I had captured.

    Although I like color images, I ocasionally do B&W for fun. Sometimes the light pollution and the atmosphere mess with the colors so bad it's the only way to save an otherwise good image. When imaging planets using IR Pass filters the color camera turns out good images in a funky color. The 685nm filter yields red images, while the 850nm filter gives purple images.

    A big benefit of using IR Pass filters is to cut through atmospheric instability. When I was doing the captures that night my frame rate for the RGB24 was SLOW at anywhere from under 10 frames per second to a max of 17. Using the IR Pass filter made the capture rate super fast, sometimes approaching 200 frames per second.
     
    Last edited: Jan 16, 2023

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