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omega centauri from Canada.

Discussion in 'Observing Celestial Objects' started by kevan hubbard, May 16, 2017 at 4:12 PM.

omega centauri from Canada.

Started by kevan hubbard on May 16, 2017 at 4:12 PM

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  1. kevan hubbard

    kevan hubbard Well-Known Member

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    Just as a point of interest as I'm hardly likely to visit this place for an stargazing can anyone confirm Omega centauri is visible from Canada. They say that from Canadas most southerly part a place called point Peele,my map suggests Windsor is the nearest large town or city,that Omega centauri has been seen?I'm guessing a latitude of about 42 degrees north or there abouts.it roughly lines up with Detroit in the USA. In fact I'm guessing that the light pollution of Detroit and Cleveland might be a major hurdle to any southerly views from this place?furthest north I've seen Omega is St Georges, Bermuda, which was about 31 degrees north.
     
  2. AstroLife

    AstroLife Active Member

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    Omega Centauri has a declination of -47.5 degrees. Point Peele's latitude is +42 degrees. So Omega's maximum altitude from Peele will be all of +0.5 degrees. Pretty much impossible to see, I'd say, regardless of light pollution.

    Harry D.
     
  3. kevan hubbard

    kevan hubbard Well-Known Member

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    My feelings exactly for although it technically rises above the horizon the atmospheric density would wash Omega out,a star being concentrated light might power through.
     
  4. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    Ditto on it's being impossible from that latitude. You could use your favorite star-charting software-program - like Stellarium or CdC - to show the horizon as a cut-off. My money's on you can't see Omega-Centauri as it's always below the horizon.

    It would be nice though. Maybe we could get hit by a hefty asteroid to knock the Earth into spinning sideways - like Uranus does. Then we'd at least have part-time exposure to the skies of the Southern Hemisphere.....

    Good thread here, Kevan - thanks for posting it!

    Dave


    Uranus' with Equatorial-Belts.jpg
    Uranus & Equatorial-Belts
     
  5. kevan hubbard

    kevan hubbard Well-Known Member

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    I reckon somewhere about the latitude of San Francisco, 35 degrees north(ish),Athens,Greece similar latitude, before Omega starts to climb in a visually way?it's probably technically a tiny bit above the horizon at point Peele but a/you want a clear night to coincide with it's greatest elongation, b/no trees,etc,to obstruct the horizon(but the lake would be OK on that score!),c/no light pollution and Cleveland looms to point Peele's s.e..
     
  6. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    Most Americans think all of Canada is to our North - 'our' being the USA. This is simply not true. I pointed out to my relatives in and around London, Ontario that I was further North here in Burlington, Vermont.

    But, alas, most American college-grads these days can't tell Australia from Iran on a map!

    I Give Up.....

    Dave
     
  7. kevan hubbard

    kevan hubbard Well-Known Member

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    Plus Alaska is well north of most of inhabited Canada! I must admit that I was surprised at how far south point Peele is I reckon a tad south of Marseille,France. Being mid continent I'm guessing it has prolonged clear weather as high pressure systems will hold over such places.also guessing brutal winters which might curtail stargazing?!although I did read of a fellow in Antarctica who would stargaze but he had to stop when it dropped below -45c lest his fillings drop out of his teeth!
     
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  8. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    One of us should enter the Lat. & Long. for Peele into Stellarium and put in a horizon - on water as it should be. Make a few screenshots and load 'em into this forum - if they don't exceed 2MB as that's the limit for the poor, baby-server we're going through here.

    Somewhere North of Peele,

    Dave



    large_detailed_road_and_physical_map_of_canada.jpg
     
  9. kevan hubbard

    kevan hubbard Well-Known Member

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    Point Peele is 41.57 degrees north whilst Omega centauri is 47.28 degrees south.if I'm right that should put Omega about 5 degrees above the horizon there not good odds for seeing it.I've spotted bright stars that low but they are a concentrated light source,Omega's bright but diffuse. I'd going to say no chance of seeing it!
     
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  10. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    41.27 N. ? Well that is a surprise. Here's another take:

    41°58'01.2"N 82°31'58.8"W

    Yeah, I wouldn't be holding my breath looking for Omega Centauri from there. Plus you could give it a tad more possibility due the actual altitude of the observing-location. Or would that work the other way around? Ack! It's going to give me a headache! :p

    Well - I've got a pretty much spot-on Lat. and Long. now. If I get the chance later this weekend, I'll go plug this into my copy of Stellarium and play! Now I'm wondering about partitioning the program.....

    I'll figure this out! :D

    Enjoy your weekend, Kevan - always a pleasure!

    Dave
     

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