Dismiss Notice
New Cookie Policy
On May 24, 2018, we published revised versions of our Terms and Rules and Cookie Policy. Your use of AstronomyConnect.com’s services is subject to these revised terms.

Organizing eyepieces

Discussion in 'General Astronomy Chat' started by Leonard, Mar 5, 2019.

Organizing eyepieces

Started by Leonard on Mar 5, 2019 at 7:18 PM

27 Replies 364 Views 2 Likes

Reply to Thread Post New Thread
  1. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    image.jpg image.jpg image.jpg I just purchased 2 tool box’s from Walmart to store my EPs in a more orderly fashion.

    The boxes are for small tools, screws, and such. They contain 17 slots which are adjustable.

    There are 2 boxes but I can’t seem to upload it to this post. Anyway they are the same type and were less than $10 for both.

    The two attached pics are my other EPs. And for whatever reason I posted the same pic twice. But I think it gets the point across.

    Thanks for being patient with me. I’m slow when it comes to posting pics.
     

    Attached Files:

    Last edited: Mar 5, 2019
    Scopejunkie and Seer like this.
  2. Seer

    Seer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Posts:
    341
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Johnstown, Pennsylvania USA
    That looks very well done. I am currently using plastic MTM ammo cans not just for my eyepieces but for a lot of my smaller gear as well.
     
  3. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2016
    Posts:
    4,205
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I have an Orion case with a strap, years ago I had plans to take it out observing so I'd have a selection of gear. However, it is impractical I find.

    cases.jpg

    The case on the right is a modified Celestron kit case. These cases are useful for storing some of my EP's. Most of the 2" stuff is now stored in plastic bolt cases.

    bolts.jpg

    It's far easier to transport bolt cases outside IMO. These days I try to take as few eyepieces out as possible. For rich field I often only take a couple of 2" eyepieces out.

    VtBk7q2.jpg

    The bino Elephant Case is the exception as it carries everything out.
     
  4. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    Now that’s tops. Nice cases and order.

    And, I understand that minimal approach. I usually take a few EPs out. Last night I took out 4. And, it turned out I didn’t need that many.
     
  5. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2016
    Posts:
    4,205
    Trophy Points:
    113
    It looks more organised than it actually is lol. I've got loads of EP's that don't have a box.

    I usually try to take out no more eyepieces than I need. Oddly, the 19mm Panoptic gets taken out a lot, whatever the others are.

    LFnro70.jpg

    These get taken out the most with the ST102, the 9mm X-Cel is usually the least used. The Morpheus normally spends the most time in the diagonal, depending on conditions.
     
  6. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    That’s a nice looking set of EPs.
     
  7. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2016
    Posts:
    4,205
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Thanks. I have the 36mm and 31mm Baader Aspherics. I actually have a bino pair of 19mm Panoptics and the 24mm Pan. I only have one Morpheus and one X-Cel.
     
  8. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    I don’t have any EPs in that range. Most of mine are good plossls, such as Tele Vue, Meade Series 5000, and Sterling Optical. (Or others I just decided to purchase). Since my primary targets are planets and brighter DSOs, and most of my scopes have a slow Focal Ratio, I can get by with a quality constructed EP that is lower priced.

    It started as a location issue. Due to some personal issues, my main observing location had to be home. This limited my targets to those of a brighter nature such as planets. But, as time went on, I found that I favored those targets. Of course that could be an acceptance of the inevitable. Lol.

    Even so, I do enjoy looking for those few gems on EBay and other such sites; those overlooked, or under appreciated EPs even if old. For instance, I have found that a well made Kellner will provide excellent views when used with a slow FR, nicely constrcted scope.

    One of my favorite EPs for planetary work is a vintage Meade MA, 9mm. It came to me packed with a 1000mm F10 Meade SCT from 1985. A friend found that scope stashed away in a Meade case in her grandfather’s garage while the family was cleaning it up. She gave the scope and case to me. It also had a 25mm Meade MA.

    These EPs were as well made as any EPs in my collection. They are constructed with what looks like a high impact black plastic housing and a nice silver plated barrel. The lens appear to be well made and are multi coated. The 9mm produces excellent views.

    I recently found an old 18mm Meade Super Wide Angle Series 4000 EP For a real nice price. It looked like it just came out if a case.

    Having wrote all that it’s probably obvious that I have way too many EPs. But I like collecting them.

    And for that matter writing about them.
     
  9. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2016
    Posts:
    4,205
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Yeah, I have way too many EP's, many are in pieces lol.

    ODEiQFC.jpg

    These are the only 2" EP's that I own at present. The GSO Kellner (third from the left) is nice and lightweight but suffers from edge of field astigmatism in anything faster than about f/8. I actually have a pair of the 28mm LET's, which are a form of Kellner I believe. One was bundled with my ED80 and I bought the other a while ago.

    KcWMhyF.jpg

    These are only about £30 to buy yet surprisingly good for what they are. I found C/2018 Y1 Iwamoto with this 28mm and an Astronomik UHC-E recently. I could see it without the filter as well, but the UHC-E passes some of the Swan bands and is a sort of ersatz comet filter. I like Kellners as they are simple and give bright images, there can be EOF seagulls though lol.
     
  10. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    Yep. I agree.

    I have read, and it makes sense, one of the major reasons plossls are packed with a lot of scopes concerns the ease in which they are manufactured. Most are symmetrical plossls with four identical lens glued in pairs. And, they do a good job.

    A recent book I gave read “Choosing and Using Astronomical Eyepieces” by William Pailini, notes the reason why some plossls perform slightly better than others. Tele Vue, Meade Series 4000, and Smart Astronomy’s Sterling Optical among a few others have their 2 outer lens concaved. This reduces distortion, but raises the cost. (Except for Meade, prob due to mass marketing on their part).

    Anyway, a good Kelner, or even a Huygens is harder to manufacture. Not that a Huygens design would outdo a plossl, but if you find one it is generally composed of plastic lens in a plastic housing with little or no coatings. Prob packed with a bad starter scope.

    I have a Super Rumsdem 4nm, an SR4 that I have had for years. One night I put it in my 80mm APO and was surprised on the view. It was fine. Obviously a tight FOV, but on axis the detail was fine. And the eyerelief was a little better than a 4nm plossl.

    So, I bought another one for comparison and sure enough it performed as did the original.

    I’m not saying let’s go back to the old EPs, but I think it’s a good idea to check these things out for yourself. A lot of what we believe could be the result of advertising.

    Like I said, I like to talk EPs. Lol
     
  11. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2016
    Posts:
    4,205
    Trophy Points:
    113
    A lot of entry level Sky-Watcher scopes are supplied with their MA (Modified Achromat) EP's, which may be a form of Kellner. I think Orion include Barsta Plossls with a lot of their stuff. A decent 10mm and 25mm were included with my 90mm Orion Mak.

    I keep meaning to read Bill P's book lol. I think the term 'Plossl' is a little over used and has essentially become a marketing term.

    I have some of the SvBony Aspherics that have a plastic eye lens, they're quite good for cheap plastic EP's though.

    IMG_20170328_113441.jpg

    These Bresser EP's are five element 60º and marketed as 'Plossls'. I think they were originally marketed as Meade. Advertising and marketing have a lot to answer for lol.
     
  12. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    I believe the Orion EPs are the classic symmetry design.

    Those Bresser’s are a 5 element of the Massuyana design. The famous vintage Celestron Ultima are of the Massuyana design. They were highly regarded. Their FOV was similar to other plossls, but the views were excellent. I’m not sure why, but I think Celestron cut into the FOV with the field stop. A few years later and that design would provide about a 60 degree FOV. Orion, Antares, and Parks all sold a similar product. Parks are still available.

    I like that design. It usually provides an FOV greater than the norm. Smart Astronomy’s Sterling Optical plossls are of this design. They have appx 60 degree FOV as did the Meade Series 5000 plossls. When using one of these plossls one can easily see the difference in FOV compared to the 4 element plossls. Some complain the 5 element design does not provide as clear an image as a 4, but I don’t think it’s an observable difference. At least not for me.

    But, as u noted the 5 lens are not truly plossls, but are labeled as such for marketing purposes.
     
  13. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2016
    Posts:
    4,205
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I'm not sure about most Barsta Plossls, some retailers here only recommend them for scopes f/6 and slower. I am not totally sure the Bresser 5 element are a pseudo Masayama.

    T7PfE8n.jpg

    The Baader Eudiascopics might be though.

    zl9ySvA.jpg

    These have been marketed under a lot of names, including Celestron I believe.

    antares15.jpg

    I am fairly sure this Japanese made 15mm 'Antares Plossl' is a Masayuma clone though.
     
  14. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    My, u have a lot of high quality EPs. And u surely know a lot about them.

    I didn’t know Bresser had a 5 element plossl until I was on their web site. I assumed they were Masayuma configuration. But we all know about assuming. On their site I think they claim a 60 degree FOV. Bit, that doesn’t seal that deal.

    And, I want to check on the Orion Sirius plossl line.

    Thanks for sharing that info.

    One more thing: I always felt the Antares Orthos as well as the Celestron Ultima, and the Orion clone all have a certain well made feel. Prob were all made by the same company. I think they all have a Japanese or Japan stamp on the barrel. They all provide solid views. If I remember right, the Ultima 35mm is supposed to provide an almost 3D view.

    That plossl in ur pic looks a lot like their Ortho line.
     
  15. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2016
    Posts:
    4,205
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I have a few expensive EP's. The Bresser are 60º but I'm fairly sure Masayama's are around 44º FOV. The Antares in the picture is under 50º and was also marketed under different names, including Celestron.

    IMG_20171117_132825.jpg

    I have a few Abbe ortho's, mostly Astro Hutech and Kokusai. I also have a 9mm Circle T, seen here extreme left, top row. Plus a few Baader BCO's.

    IMG_20181108_115420.jpg

    The two 7.5mm Plossls above are both Barsta. The one on the left is an Orion Sirius. The one on the right is a Sky-Watcher, although there is no brand name. I put a brass draw tube on it. Apart from that it is identical to the Orion.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2019
  16. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    I thought the Massuyana could provide a decent 60 degree FOV. And Celestron, Orion, etc. just cut that FOV off with their field stop. I’ll have to look that up. All this time I may have been wrong.

    I have the 7.5 Orion Sirius. I often put it use in planets and bright DSOs such as the Orion Neb. When used with any of my scopes with a slow FR up to my 8”, F 6 DOB, it does a very good job. Nice contrast and clarity with an FOV and Eyerelief as one expects in a plossl.

    Isn’t that circle T a rare EP?
     
  17. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2016
    Posts:
    4,205
    Trophy Points:
    113
    You could be right. Baader BCO's have bigger field stops to give them more than 42º but the extra FOV isn't as sharp and is intended to aid target acquisition.

    circleT1.jpg

    The Circle T is very nice and fairly rare. I've read they were made by hand by Tani San, who is now deceased I believe. I actually had a different drawtube on it for a while but put its original tube back on. It has an undercut but it isn't any problem. The tube has virtually perfectly made threads and I've never known a filter not thread into it, even Lumicon.

    circleT2.jpg

    It is beautifully made and one of my favourite EP's. It's superb as a lunar/planetary eyepiece, with excellent contrast.
     
  18. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    It sure is a nice looking EP, almost brand new.

    I have exchanged the barrel on several of my EPs especially with my Meade EPs. If the Meade EP is one which I believe I might use with a filter, then I can screw a filter into the field end. I have found that the section of the Meade EP’s, the part of the housing that accepts the barrel is a normal or standard thread.

    You mentioned the ease of screwing filters in that circle T. Isn’t it a pain screwing filters into eyepiece threads in the dark, especially Meade EPs. There had always been some debate about their field end threads. I have read it plainly stateded and to a point, that Meade uses a slightly different thread in the field end, while some say they are unsure. I know I stripped a filter while using it with a Meade EP. This was before I knew of this issue.

    I can say for sure, if I changed the Meade barrel with a standard barrel I didn’t have the same problem. I would put the Meade barrel on an EP that u felt was unlikely to be used with a filter.
     
  19. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2016
    Posts:
    4,205
    Trophy Points:
    113
    I've never had any problems with 1.25" Meade Plossls. Baader and GSO use M28.5 x 0.6 threads for their 1.25" drawtubes and filters.

    M28.5 x 0.6 will basically thread into anything. There's no real standard for 2" filter threads. Astronomik threads can be problematical. It's not so bad threading filters in the dark if the bloody threads are compatible lol.

    Dodgy threads are probably even worse on Newtonians where there is the potential for the filter to come loose and fall and hit the primary.

    moon.jpg

    My plan was to observe the setting Moon this evening with the ED80 then switch to a 2" diagonal and eyepieces for some rich field. I saw the Moon at 80x and 100x briefly lol. I only managed to use a 7.5mm Sky-Watcher Plossl and a 6mm Vixen NPL. It was a fun five minutes anyway.
     
  20. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    So, what happened, did clouds due u in? It sounded like a solid plan.

    Gosh, I thought the Meade thread issue was generally accepted in the amateur astronomy community.

    I have read about the Meade thread issue in several books. “Star Ware” 4th edition by Phil Harrington and “Astronomy Hacks” by Robert And Barbara Thompson are two that come to mind.

    No matter.

    I also went out tonight. Used my Orion 8” F6 DOB. It’s an Intelli-scope, often referred to as a “push too” scope. I was testing my newly purchased 18mm Meade Series 4000 Super Wide Angle. I picked it up on EBay. I also used my 20mm Meade QX and my 26mm Meade QX 2” EP, my 26mm, 14mm, 9mm, and 5.5mm Meade Series 5000 plossls and my Celestron 2x Ultima Barlow. I didn’t use any filters.

    My main target was the Orion Neb.

    The 18mm provided a wonderful view with high contast, a nice FOV of 68 degrees, and good eyerelief. The Neb showed well. I combined it with my 2x Barlow and was treated with an even better look at the Neb.

    The 20mm QX did a fine job. When used with my DOB I see distortion in the outer 10 percent, but it’s not that severe. The image presented was nice with good contrast and clarity.

    The Meade 5000’s all did a good job with their 60 degree FOV and 5 element configuration. The 14mm was very nice, wonderful contrast, and distortion free. The 9 and 5.5mm (which is a 6 lens design) always produce good views when observing the Orion Neb. That Neb responds well to high Mag.

    On the lower end of magnification I was especially impressed with the Meade 26mm 1.25“ EP series 5000. It gave me a good, almost distortion free view. This combined with the 60 degree FOV and with this EP’s focal lenth gave me a view that was hard to beat.

    Also of note was the Meade 26mm QX 2” EP. I had to place the eyepiece about 1/2 inch further back in the focus tube so I could reach focus. In other words, if I let the EP set all the way in the focuser tube as is normal, I was barely able to achieve focus. After backing the EP 1/2 inch in the focus tube, I was able to better adjust focus. The result was a wonderful sight that was very full and rich. The stars were sharp without distortion till the very edge of the FOV and the Neb was clear and nicely presented. The eyerelief was excellent. The major drawback; I’ll prob need to purchase an extension tube.

    Getting back to the 18mm, the stars were sharp and without distortion till about the outer 5 percent. The Neb was very pronounced, yet I could clearly see the embedded stars. It did a great job and was easy on my eyes. I think I could have looked through it all night.

    I had a real nice time.
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2019

Share This Page