Dismiss Notice
We were experiencing issues with a server migration and upgrade to the underlying platform. Everything should be up and running now, but if you notice any issues with the site please head over to Report and Issue Forums to let us know. If you are unable able to do so, free to email me directly atgeorge@astronomyconnect.com. Thank you for your patience and understanding.
-George

Saturn 05-09-2017

Discussion in 'Astrophotography and Imaging' started by Ed D, May 13, 2017.

Saturn 05-09-2017

Started by Ed D on May 13, 2017 at 6:52 AM

5 Replies 58 Views 3 Likes

Reply to Thread Post New Thread
  1. Ed D

    Ed D Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2017
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Sunny South Florida
    My newfound adventures in planetary imaging continue. This time I purposely stayed up late to capture the ringed planet. I had to use more gain and longer exposures compared to what I had been using on Jupiter because of the lesser brightness of this solar system gem. Still, capturing 1,500 frames was very fast. These were taken with my 5" Mak.

    Click on the thumbnails to see the full size image:

    Saturn 2017 05-09 pic1.jpg
    Subject: Saturn pic1
    Date: 05/09/2017
    Time: 02:30hr EDT (05/05 06:30 UT)
    Location: Miami, Florida 25.61N 80.42W
    Conditions: 7-8/10 Pickering, good transparency
    Instrument: 5" Mak w/2.0x Barlow
    Focal Length: f/28.6
    Camera: ZWO ASI120MC
    Image Size: 1280x960
    Frames: 1500 light frames
    Software: SharpCap 2.9, RegiStax 6

    Saturn 2017 05-09 pic2.jpg
    Subject: Saturn pic2
    Date: 05/09/2017
    Time: 02:30hr EDT (05/05 06:30 UT)
    Location: Miami, Florida 25.61N 80.42W
    Conditions: 7-8/10 Pickering, good transparency
    Instrument: 5" Mak w/1.5x Barlow cell
    Focal Length: f/21.45
    Camera: ZWO ASI120MC
    Image Size: 1280x960
    Frames: 1500 light frames
    Software: SharpCap 2.9, RegiStax 6

    Thanks for looking.
    Ed D
     
  2. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 10, 2016
    Posts:
    1,158
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Very nice Ed.
     
  3. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2016
    Posts:
    758
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Just the thumbnail does it for my memory. It looks just like my first viewing of what I had thought might be Saturn. It was from the rooftop of my parents' house in 1972. If my mom knew what I was doing and where - she'd have had a screaming fit!

    I'd gone out an attic window carrying the 50mm F/6 Japanese refractor (actually from Carton Optical Industries, LTD - exquisite optics!). I placed the baby tripod over the top-most ridge on the 45°-angled rooftop, and layed-down on the incline to view what looked to be the dull-yellow 'star.' And that thumbnail shows what greeted my eye at the top of the 12.5mm Huygens eyepiece.

    I developed an immediate case of 'Aperture-Fever.' Needless to say - I was hooked!

    Great view, Ed! Fantasic work! Thank you!

    Dave
     
  4. Orion25

    Orion25 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    May 23, 2016
    Posts:
    170
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Georgia
    Total awesomeness, Ed! I was up pretty late observing over the weekend and couldn't miss Saturn. The Cassini division gets me every time. Waiting for June 15!
     
  5. Ed D

    Ed D Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2017
    Posts:
    90
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    Sunny South Florida
    Mak, Dave, Reggie;

    Thank you. I had no idea posting my images would have such positive effects on this, and another forum. Because of the small scopes I'm using my images are not the super detailed, large scale I see often. In fact, as a long time planetary observer one of my goals is for my images to look more like what is seen at the eyepiece, while providing more detail in a subtle manner. It's also a lot easier on the wallet being able to get results with modest equipment.

    Thanks again,
    Ed D
     
  6. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2016
    Posts:
    758
    Trophy Points:
    43
    I know just what you mean: Giant pics. straight out of some magazine. Then a new person to the field/hobby is left feeling overwhelmed and disappointed with their own views - and astronomy winds-up in the trash-can.

    To show honest images while citing the type of telescope (and camera if doing AP), eyepiece used (if any in AP), and magnification, would have helped these folks by leaps, bounds, and light-yesrs.

    And, by the by, there is a website* out there showing one photographers' large number of beautiful images of all sorts out there in outer-space - all done with a ST80 F5 Achromatic-Refractor. Little achromats, while being "Pooh! Poohed" by the APO-Crowd, this less-expensive scope (and many other small scopes available) ARE quite capable. And if doing AP (AstroPhotography), and CA (Chromatic Abberation), there's some 'blue' around a bright object in the image - this can be filtered out in the process of stacking the images in ones' favorite software-program.

    I'd like to your type of ambition be widely embraced - and thereby open astronomy to everyone! Including the less well-heeled folks who don't have the $$$ to have nothing but TeleVue®s' in their eyepiece-cases.

    Please carry on with your noble project - I've been up to the same - and I hope small scopes will be the latest 'craze' among amateur-astronomers.

    All the best -

    Dave


    * - I'll see where I have it - somewhere. :p
     

Share This Page