Dismiss Notice
New Cookie Policy
On May 24, 2018, we published revised versions of our Terms and Rules and Cookie Policy. Your use of AstronomyConnect.com’s services is subject to these revised terms.

THE DIVISIONS IN THE SATURN RINGS

Discussion in 'Astrophotography and Imaging' started by Avani Soares, Feb 3, 2019.

THE DIVISIONS IN THE SATURN RINGS

Started by Avani Soares on Feb 3, 2019 at 7:07 PM

11 Replies 268 Views 2 Likes

Reply to Thread Post New Thread
  1. Avani Soares

    Avani Soares Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2016
    Posts:
    226
    Trophy Points:
    63
    [​IMG]
    Although a little delayed I decided to publish this GIF that was sent to me at times by friend Ruud, Gif the one that evidences the diverse divisions existing in the rings of Saturn.
    It was based on a photo of me that surprised me because it shows what can be done with a good aperture telescope, a proper seeing and the correct use of a 685 nanometer infrared filter.
    August, 04-2018; 01:16 TU
    CMI: 356.9 CMIII: 199.0
    C14 HD + ASI 290MC + PM 2X + IR 685

    PS: You have to click on the link to see the GIF!
     
    Gabby76 and Seer like this.
  2. Avani Soares

    Avani Soares Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2016
    Posts:
    226
    Trophy Points:
    63
  3. Seer

    Seer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Posts:
    341
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Johnstown, Pennsylvania USA
    I am still working on just being able to see the Cassini Division.
     
    Gabby76 and Avani Soares like this.
  4. Avani Soares

    Avani Soares Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2016
    Posts:
    226
    Trophy Points:
    63
    Reissuing
    DIVISIONS AND GAPS IN THE RINGS OF SATURN, REALITY, OR IMAGINATION?
    A good photo sometimes makes us ramble, in this photo for example many appear to be the divisions in the rings of Saturn, however, as my friend David Wayne Knisely called my attention not everything that seems to be reality is, but always remain doubts.
    The only recognized divisions in the rings are the very narrow gaps of Colombo and Maxwell in ring C, the division of Cassini between rings B and A, the division of Encke very narrow in ring A, and the Keeler gap near the outer edge of the ring A. Of these divisions and gaps, only the division of Cassini and Encke are clearly shown in the image above. Other variations of brightness, similar to narrow rings shown in the rings, are generally not gaps or true divisions, but there is doubt as there are gaps.
    There is a small difference between what is divisions and gaps. Many texts do not differentiate between the two terms, but I believe that there is not much problem in this. The divisions are the separations between the large groups of rings (the groups A, B, C, D and ect), or gaps, are the spaces within the groups of rings. In general, divisions are much larger than gaps.
    Below, I translated gap as division, as is customary in several publications. But to make clear which division is a gap I left the name in English in parentheses.
    NOTE: The distance measure is made from the center of the planet to the beginning of the ring.
    Ring D
    Distance: 66.970 - 74.490 km
    Width: 7,500 km
    Ring C
    Distance: 74.490 - 91.980 km
    Width: 17,500 km
    Division of Columbus (Columbus Gap)
    Distance: 77,800 km
    Width: 100 km
    Maxwell Division (Maxwell Gap)
    Distance: 87,500 km
    Width: 270 km
    Bond Division (Bond Gap)
    Distance: .690 - 88,720 km
    Width: 30 km
    Dawes Division (Dawes Gap)
    Distance: 90,200 - 90,220 km
    Width: 20 km
    Ring B
    Distance: 91,980 - 117,580 km
    Width: 25,500 km
    Cassini Division (Cassini Division)
    Distance: 117,500 - 122,050 km
    Width: 4,700 km
    Division of Huygens (Huygens gap)
    Distance: 117.680 km
    Width: 285 km - 440 km
    Herschel Division (Herschel Gap)
    Distance: 118,183 - 118,285 km
    Width: 102 km
    Russell Division (Russell Gap)
    Distance: 118,597 - 118,630 km
    Width: 33 km
    Division Jeffreys (Jeffreys Gap)
    Distance: 118,931 - 118,969 km
    Width: 38 km
    Kuiper Division (Kuiper Gap)
    Distance: 119,403 -119,406 km
    Width: 3 km
    Leplace Division (Leplace Gap)
    Distance: 119.848 - 120.086 km
    Width: 238 km
    Bessel Division (Bessel Gap)
    Distance: 120,305 - 120,318 km
    Width: 10 km
    Barnard Division (Barnard Gap)
    Distance: 120,305 - 120,318 km
    Width: 13 km
    Ring A
    Distance: 122,050 - 136,770 km
    Width: 14,600 km
    Encke Division (Encke Gap)
    Distance: 133.570 km
    Width: 325 km
    Keeler Division (Keeler Gap)
    Distance: 136,530 km
    Width: 35 km
    Roche Division (Roche Division)
    Distance: 136.770 - 139.380 km
    Width: 2,600 km
    F ring
    Distance: 140,224 km
    Width: 30 km - 500 km
    G ring
    Distance: 166,000 - 174,000 km
    Width: 8,000 km
    Ring E
    Distance: 180,000 - 480,000 km
    Width: 300,000 km
    August, 04-2018; 01:16 TU
    CMI: 356.9 CMIII: 199.0
    C14 HD + ASI 290MC + PM 2X + IR 685

    [​IMG]
     
    Gabby76 likes this.
  5. Gabby76

    Gabby76 Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 16, 2016
    Posts:
    449
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Slovakia/ Canada
    With steady, reasonably dark skies your 80mm refractor will show it to you.
    Keep trying you will get it!
     
    Seer likes this.
  6. Scopejunkie

    Scopejunkie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 14, 2018
    Posts:
    124
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Tehachapi, CA
    What magnification are you using when you have observed Saturn? The Cassini Division should not be too much of a challenge with a good 80mm refractor if the seeing is ok and enough magnification is used, even in a light polluted sky. The Cassini Division, if I remember correctly, is only 0.8" wide, so it does require some higher magnification to be seen well. Since the Cassini Division is only 0.8" wide most smaller instruments are only seeing it as a "contrast feature" which generally requires a well corrected telescope at 80mm.
     
    Last edited: Feb 6, 2019
    Seer likes this.
  7. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    94
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    I can easily see the Casinni Division with my Orion 80MM, F7.5 APO. With decent skies it’s clearly visible under mag of 100x. It’s been a while, but I have observed it with my 114mm F8 reflector also under 100x. Of course apperature is important in observing Cassini. More light that a larger apperature gathers causes the division to appear more clear and sharp. It’s easily observed with my 8” scopes.

    And, with an 8” scope one can push the mag without as much worry of drowning out the view because of over mag.

    As “scopejunkie“ wrote, you should observe it with an 80MM scope given enough mag.

    Also, a nice sharp eyepiece is important. A good plossl or Ortho fits the bill.
     
    Last edited: Feb 7, 2019
    Seer likes this.
  8. Seer

    Seer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Posts:
    341
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Johnstown, Pennsylvania USA
    My 80mm was my first telescope but I really haven't started using it yet. I've been using mostly my 60mm telescope and binoculars.
     
  9. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    94
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    I understand. The 80mm should be substantial increase in apperature.
     
    Scopejunkie likes this.
  10. Seer

    Seer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Posts:
    341
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Johnstown, Pennsylvania USA
    It has to do with when I bought it, the time it takes to set up, and where I reside.
    I purchased my 80mm EQ refractor when I was still taking care of my Mother who had a stroke and could not do anything for herself. It was one of the things that I bought in advance. I could not even try to use it at all while I was taking care of her.
    Where I am forced to reside is a very bad and dangerous place. In one of the years that I resided here there were about a half dozen people murdered just right around the outside of my building. I have to take precaution when I go out to observe. What I have been doing up to now is using speed. I go out an take as quick a look as I can an hurry back inside. The EQ mount of my 80mm refractor takes to long to set up and take down and exposes me for to long. I am planning on trying to use it in the early morning instead of in the evening which might be safer.
     
  11. Leonard

    Leonard Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 1, 2019
    Posts:
    94
    Trophy Points:
    18
    Location:
    West Virginia USA
    That’s sounds tough. I live in West Virginia. It’s always been save compared to most places. But in the last few years u have noticed a slow change.

    I am a runner. Due to several personal issues I often run through Clarksburg, (the town where I live) in the night. This has seldom been a problem.

    However, that has been changing. I see more homeless out late at night. Fir the most part it’s not a problem. But lately some of the homeless are high.
     
  12. Seer

    Seer Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2018
    Posts:
    341
    Trophy Points:
    28
    Location:
    Johnstown, Pennsylvania USA
    It has always been dangerous here but it is much more so now. Johnstown has become like the states dumping ground for its undesirables.
     

Share This Page