Dismiss Notice
New Cookie Policy
On May 24, 2018, we published revised versions of our Terms and Rules and Cookie Policy. Your use of AstronomyConnect.com’s services is subject to these revised terms.

class="prefix prefixSilver">Discussion The First Light with the Prototype 8x42 Space Walker™ 3D Binoculars Discussion

Discussion in 'All Other Observing Equipment' started by StaringAtStars, Mar 6, 2016.

The First Light with the Prototype 8x42 Space Walker™ 3D Binoculars Discussion

Started by StaringAtStars on Mar 6, 2016 at 4:13 AM

4 Replies 1842 Views 2 Likes

Reply to Thread Post New Thread
  1. aeajr

    aeajr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2016
    Posts:
    210
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Long Island, NY, USA
    Great article but I have to admit I don't understand it. Aren't all binoculars, by nature, 3D? Two eyes, two lenses and such.

    Having never used 3D binoculars I have no frame of reference. It sounded like there was a third image in the center. Can that be right?

    Can you help me understand?
     
    StaringAtStars likes this.
  2. BillP

    BillP Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2015
    Posts:
    165
    Trophy Points:
    343
    Location:
    Vienna, VA
    All binoculars can and do produce natural parallax with then lets your brain see the view in multiple levels of depth. However, the further away the target is the less the depth can be perceived due to the small baseline distance between the two optics of the binocular. So when you are viewing the stars, you will see no sense of depth because all those targets are just too far away. With the 3D binoculars what is done is that several "array" panels are placed in the FOV which artificially produce this same parallax effect but as if the baseline distance between the two optics was huge. As a result, it appears as if the star field is very close and you can see varying depths between the stars. So in these binoculars there are three array panels, one in center and one in upper left and the other on the right of center. Each array panel simulates a different offset or baseline distance so each array shows stars within it at its own distinct depth level so you get 3 differing depth levels from the 3 arrays, and the non-arrayed portion of the FOV shows the 4th level.

    In other words, objects in center array appear closest, those in a second array appear less close, those in the non-arrayed area appear further, and those in last array appear furthest. So something like that.
     
  3. aeajr

    aeajr Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 16, 2016
    Posts:
    210
    Trophy Points:
    43
    Location:
    Long Island, NY, USA
    Thanks. That helps.
     
  4. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jan 5, 2016
    Posts:
    3,356
    Trophy Points:
    113
    Great review, Bill. I am quite intrigued on may levels! Fascinating things these are.

    Thanks -

    Dave - expecting thunder & lightning tomorrow! Yay Spring!
     

Share This Page