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21P/Giacobini-Zinner?

Discussion in 'Observing Celestial Objects' started by Mak the Night, Sep 10, 2018.

21P/Giacobini-Zinner?

Started by Mak the Night on Sep 10, 2018 at 2:44 AM

27 Replies 218 Views 1 Likes

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  1. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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    Anyone observed this Mag 7 comet?

    Screenshot 2018-09-10 at 09.53.00.png

    I believe it's in Auriga at the moment and heading for Gemini. If it wasn't for the clouds this would be visible around 03:00 for me, maybe earlier.

    IMG_20170516_112238.jpg

    I even have 'comet' filters at the ready lol!

    IMG_20170807_103924.jpg
     
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  2. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    You think the Astronomik UHC-E would be a good choice for it? Certainly worth a try! I have an actual Lumicon SWAN-Filter. I'll be looking too.


    comet_21P_Giacobini-Zinner-1_full.jpg
    Comet 21/P Giacobini-Zinner



    Sept. 10, 2018 at 227 a.m. EDT.jpg
    Sept. 10, 2018 at 227 a.m. EDT

    Happy Hunting, all!
     
    Last edited: Sep 10, 2018
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  3. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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    The UHC-E should be pretty good on this type of comet I think. I've used it on comets before with some success.

    Screenshot 2018-09-10 at 13.30.02.png

    I'm clouded in for the foreseeable future though.
     
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  4. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    Don't know 'bout dat. We're supposed to be having pouring rain of "Biblical Proportions" right now. Bright & Sunny at present. Our forecasts' over here have been amazingly wrong lately. And you get what we had quite often. So...

    Watch the sky! 21P Giacobini-Zinner is a 'Jupiter-family' comet, and our astro-press has made a point that this one is "Very GREEN." This means it's got a large tail and is comprised of a lot of Cyanogen(>C=N<) which is the simplest 'Cyanide' (or Nitrile in Organic-Chemistry), and is an essential building-block for life (or death). This means it should respond really well to a filter.

    Good Luck!
     
  5. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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    Cool.
     
  6. jgroub

    jgroub Well-Known Member

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    Yup, just saw it Monday night, around 2:30am, about 1 1/2 degrees south-southeast of M37. Either Astronomy or S&T had a map, and it was dead easy to find.

    In my 5-inch Mak, it was just a fuzzy little ball, maybe 5-8 minutes across.
     
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  7. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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    Saw it about three hours ago with my ED72.

    Screenshot 2018-09-13 at 05.41.22.png
     
  8. sickfish

    sickfish Well-Known Member

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    To cloudy around here lately.
    Going to have a couple of chances this weekend then we get the remainder of the hurricane.
    Going to set the alarm for tonight and see what I got.
     
  9. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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    Good luck.
     
  10. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    I hope you get some clear skies! Before the Carolina Water-Moccasins swim up your toilets! :eek: Or Colony Gas fixes the gas-main's in Watertown....:eek:
     
  11. Nebula

    Nebula Well-Known Member

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    Very good picture of the comet Dave, that's truly a premium shot. Impressive amount of green too.
     
  12. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    Well, it's not mine. But I but I agree about the 'green' being very impressive - and that's why I choose it. The green indicates it has a good amount of cyanogen - which I explained the significance of. Or as I call it: 'Cosmic Cyanide' - which if you breathed it it would kill you. But without it, we wouldn't be here. No life would!

    The SWAN-Filter is made to bring out the full extent of the tail of gaseous comets. And the green-tails of cyanogen comets is what the SWAN works for.


    Lumicon-Swan-Band-Comet-filter-1-25-.jpg

    SWAN Band Filter.JPG
    SWAN-Band Lightbulb-Test
     
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  13. Nebula

    Nebula Well-Known Member

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    At every light bulb test you will get a like from me @Dave In Vermont :D For the picture, well, the person who did that, has a lot of skill. And it's a toxic cyanogen comet!

    So I understand a UHC filter should have some effect on them too? The swan is it similar to UHC or OIII ?
     
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  14. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    The particular SWAN Filter I have is from Lumicon and is over 10 years old. And they wrote the exact range in nanometers on each filter. That's 'nm's' Nebs. And this one states 494nm to 525nm.

    It has an 85% pass at 501nm up to 85% pass at 514nm. Start your own diagram and and start the slope upward at 494nm - peak it 85% at 501nm and start going down at 514nm and end altogether at 525nm. Like an upside-down letter 'U' if you understand.

    This is why it's important to learn this 'stuff' if you're going to 'play' with filters in general. The 'new' LUMICON is still the only source for these specialized filters out there. The full name is both "Lumicon Comet Filter" or "Lumicon Swan Band." I wish someone else would come along and make this filter. Maybe Baader? Are you listening, Baader Planetarium in Germany? <Cough! Cough!> <AHEM!>


    PS - As I've figured out how to shrink these images from over 2 MB down to around 1.05 MB, I'll get around to publishing my entire collection of these sometime soon. Do remember we can only add an image that's 2MB or under here in A-C. Keep pestering me to remind me to do this? Thanks!


    PSS - Lookie what I found! Now from reading my description, how well did I do in the written description? Could you, from words alone, get an image in your mind that resembles this actual transmission-band chart? I'm trying to refine my methodology here, so please respond, Nebs.


    Lumicon Comet Filter - SWAN Filter.jpg
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2018 at 2:17 AM
  15. Nebula

    Nebula Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the spectral data analysis for the Comet filter. I might try my NPB on the comet eventually, just for fun, I see it has a passband between 425 and 525, wider then the Lumicon Swan but perhaps I could have some positive effects..

    I find the analysis of the swan slightly similar to a UHC without the >625nm part that some UHC will let pass.

    The Lumicon Swan band Comet filter!
     
  16. Mak the Night

    Mak the Night Well-Known Member

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    Ersatz comet filter ~ https://www.astronomik.com/en/visual-filters/uhc-e-filter.html

    The Astronomik UHC-E filter provides a FWHM of 45nm and blocks the light of typical streetlights (e.g. sodium and mercury vapour) as well as airglow. Thus it increases contrast between your target and the night sky. The contrast enhancement is less than that of the Astronomik UHC filter, but at the same time the transmitted amount of starlight is greater. It's therefore better suited to smaller telescopes. As the UHC-E filter passes a spectral line of Carbon (due to the higher FWHM) it opens up the possibility of comet observation.

    fac0e008-adbc-4bad-9ded-99342634dfdd.png

     
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  17. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    Very good to both of you! I agree the UHC-E looks like an excellent chice for comet 21/P - Giacobini-Zinner. And should work as an ersatz OIII, Nebs. UHC in a small scope, too. Based on my knowledge and the 'Miles-O'-Files' too! :p

    Catch you later - no sleep yet. So 'THUD!' o_O
     
  18. sickfish

    sickfish Well-Known Member

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    No Columbia Gas here in Watertown.
    I have only 3 filters.
    Orion SkyGlow Filter
    Orion Moon Filter
    And a brand new TV Nebustar II
    May try the SkyGlow on the comet just to see, I have to get up early anyway to try the new TV on Orion.
     
  19. Dave In Vermont

    Dave In Vermont Well-Known Member

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    A TeleVue® Nebustar II? Never heard of that before! You've got my attention! Do tell me your findings, please? Thank you!

    Off to my futon - it must be feeling neglected! :p

    CrAsH! :eek:
     
  20. sickfish

    sickfish Well-Known Member

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